Multisite Churches

The multi-site movement is a hot topic right now in the church world. I think there are some things to be concerned about, as there are with every movement, but over all I see it as a really healthy thing. There is no doubt that there are a variety of different ways to do it, and some are better than others, but is safe to say that it is working. Here are some of my thoughts on it.

More Than Just a Fad

Some are writing the whole idea off as a fad, but this is just not the case. In fact the whole idea of the multi-site church is far from new. I think that, at least in the SBC, the decline of the local association has left a hole that needs to be filled. I still believe in the necessity of the local association, but I must save that topic for another day. Nevertheless, the decline of the association is obvious, and one of the reasons the multi-site church is becoming so popular is that it is replacing a missing piece to the puzzle.

All through church history we can observe churches networking together in one way or another, whether through the bishop in the Roman Catholic Church, Methodist districts, or the churches of Galatia to which Paul wrote his letter. The multi-site movement is not a continuation of any of those models verbatim, but there are undeniable parallels. The point is, the concept is not new, and it is not going away any time soon.

Church Planting 

One of the healthiest things about the multi-site church is the possibility it presents for healthy church planting. Rather than taking a core team and starting from scratch, the multi-site church can use its resources and people to make a new campus. These campuses should be designed to eventually become autonomous. When the time to let go of the church comes, there is already a stability that could not have been achieved otherwise.

This will not only help the new church get on its feet, but it will provide missional momentum in the sending church. Both the new church and the old church will benefit from the fact that a new missional DNA will be ever present in the life of the church and the individual lives of its members.

Revitalization 

Along those same lines, the multi-site church can be utilized for the revitalization of declining churches. Imagine how great it would be if healthy churches would respectfully adopt struggling churches to prevent closure and bring new life. I am not suggesting that big churches should take over small churches like a business merger, but I am suggesting that healthy churches could give a little extra boost to the struggling church. They can make this struggling church a campus for a season, and just like I mentioned with the plant, that campus would be released as an autonomous revitalized church.

Pastoral Training 

One of the greatest benefits of the movement is probably one of the most under utilized. I believe that each campus of the multi-site church needs a live preacher/pastor. The video venue is working, and great things are being accomplished for the Kingdom. I just see an opportunity that is being missed in this model.

The benefits of having a real life preacher on every campus are numerous, but I will focus on the fact that young pastors could be trained up in healthy environments with great leadership and mentors. These campuses have the benefit of strong leadership from the sending church, and they can take a risk on a young pastor just starting out. This campus pastor role can be used to train up an entire generation of young pastors and preachers for the glory of God, and the result will be a healthier church in the long run.

Network of Neighborhood Churches

Jimmy Scroggins is the pastor of Family Church (formerly FBC West Palm Beach) in West Palm Beach, Florida. He, over the course of many years, led this SBC legacy church to become a thriving multi-site congregation. They have chosen to call their method, “a network of neighborhood churches.” The idea is that every neighborhood in south Florida will have a church to minister there. Rather than pushing for a regional mega church where people drive from all over to attend, they have chosen to take their people and start smaller congregations all through the region. In so doing, they are training up new pastors, they are reaching people who otherwise wouldn’t be reached, and they have successfully revitalized an old downtown first baptist church.

This is my preferred model, and there are no limits to its possibilities. This method does not require great financial support, it cuts out the need for large scale building projects, it can be done in smaller towns, and normal sized churches can put it into practice. Their method is not perfect, but it does seem to have great potential.

In conclusion, I am not completely sold out for the multi-site movement. I am however encouraged by its ability to reach the lost, plant new churches, and rescue the dying church. I am currently working in a multisite church and have seen first hand the good it can do. I am looking forward to see what the future holds for multi-site churches.

-Brayden L. Buss

Church Revitalization

America has become quite attached to tv personalities Chip and Joanna Gaines. The American people love the show Fixer Upper, where this fun loving couple takes old neglected houses and gives them new life. This  phenomenon has started a national trend. Young couples aren’t wanting to build new houses or move into new suburban neighborhoods, because they would rather bring new life to an old house with character. It is my hope and prayer that such an emphasis crosses over into the church world, and we once again see abandoned congregations filled with new life.

My Passion

Every pastor has a pet topic or an issue about which they are very passionate. I have shared previously that I have a passion for preaching, but I am also very interested in church revitalization. I can remember the day when my heart changed and was bent toward these congregations. I was speaking with my pawpaw about a local church that my friend was thinking about pastoring. I told Pawpaw that I didn’t think he should go there because that church had problems. He gently but sternly told me that it may not be the church for my friend, but that didn’t meant that a pastor shouldn’t go there. He said the Lord did not say, “I am not going to send a pastor there because they have wolves,” but rather, he reminded me that it is those churches that need a pastor the most.

My heart breaks for all the churches in this nation that have long left the glory days, and find  their greatest joy by looking back at the way things used to be. These churches have been in decline for decades, and have largely been neglected by capable pastors only fueling the slow cycle to their closure. I cannot help but wonder if we have left the one to enjoy the comfort of the ninety-nine. There are hundreds of churches who want to move forward, and they are just waiting on someone to lead them into the future.

The County Seat Church

Most guys my age that are entering ministry don’t really care about the county seat church. In fact, I have talked to some that don’t even know what that phrase means. There was a day when the county seat church was the place every young seminarian dreamed about, but those days are gone. For the most part the county seat churches are in great need of revitalization.

These churches once had great influence in their regions. The other churches in the area could look to FBC County Seat for advice and help when things weren’t going well. The county seat church always led in baptisms, cooperative program giving, and they called/produced some of the greatest pastors in the nation. What has caused this dramatic change? That is a discussion for another day, but what I can say is these churches need pastors.

My Vision

It is my desire to pastor a county seat type church one day, that is a church that was once influential and successful but now has fallen into decline. I want to pastor these churches for an entirely different reason than men of days past. I want to go here because the Lord’s words burn in my heat,  “it is the sick that need the doctor not the healthy.” The Lord has burdened my soul for these neglected churches, and I am confident that God is not done using them. He can restore them, making them the great pillars of the American church once again, and I want to be a part of that movement!

 

-Brayden L. Buss